Drown, Ruth B. (1891–1965)
American chiropractor who developed the pioneer work of
Albert Abrams (1863–1924) in electronics (later known as raDriesch,
Hans Encyclopedia of Occultism & Parapsychology • 5th Ed.
454
dionics), involving the correction of disease conditions by
shortwave low-power electromagnetics and alternating magnetic
currents. Dr. Drown was born in Greeley, Colorado, on
October 21, 1891.
Drown called her treatment radio therapy and founded the
Radio Therapy Institute as an outlet for her work. It involved
placing a blood sample from a patient in a machine ‘‘tuned’’ to
the patient and ‘‘broadcasting’’ healing radiations. This controversial
system of treatment was developed further by George
De la Warr in England. He describes her technique in several
books, including The Science & Philosophy of the Drown Radio
Therapy (1938) and The Theory & Technique of the Drown Radio
Therapy & Radio Vision Instruments (1939).
Her apparatus was granted a British patent but declared
‘‘fraudulent’’ by the Food and Drug Administration in the
1940s. In 1950, at the request of several of Drown’s supporters,
an investigation was conducted at the University of Chicago.
With blind controls, she was unable to make accurate diagnoses,
and the American Medical Association reported on the
negative results. These texts made Drown and anyone using
her techniques open to charges of medical malpractice, and she
soon disappeared from the public eye and lived the rest of her
life in relative obscurity.
Through most of her life, Drown was also a metaphysical
teacher and she developed her own system, which is presented
in her book The Forty-Nine Degrees (1957). The ‘‘Gnostic’’ system
discusses the soul’s journey from heaven to earth and its
eventual return, and the knowledge needed for that return.
Drown died in 1965 while awaiting trial for fraud.
Sources
Drown, Ruth, ed. The Forty-Nine Degrees The Road to Divine
Truth. New York Greenwich Book Publishers, 1957.
Inglis, Brian. The Case for Unorthodox Medicine. New York
Berkley Books, 1965.

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