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Zoomancy

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Zoomancy
A system of divination based on the appearances and behavior
of animals.

Zoaphite

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Zoaphite
According to the seventeenth-century traveler Jan Struys, a
zoaphite was a species of cucumber that fed on neighboring
plants. Its fruit had the form of a lamb, with the head, feet, and
tail of that animal distinctly apparent, and it is thus called, in
the language of the country, Canaret, or Conarer, signifying a
lamb. Struys described this plant in his book Drie aanmerkelijke
en seer rampspoedige (1676), translated as The Voyages and Travels
of Jan Struys (1684).
Its skin was covered with a white down. The ancient Tartars
thought a great deal of it and most of them kept it carefully in
their houses, where Jan Struys says he saw it several times.
It grew on a stalk about three feet in height, to which it was
attached by a sort of tendril. On this tendril it could move about
and turn and bend toward the herbs on which it fed, and without
which it soon dried up and withered. Wolves loved it, devouring
it with avidity, because, reportedly, it tasted like the
flesh of a lamb. The author added that he had been assured
that it had bones, flesh, and blood, thus being known in its native
country as zoaphite, or animal plant.

Zabulon

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Tower Bridge at night, London, UK

Zabulon

This is the name of a demon said to have possessed a lay sister among
the community of nuns at Loudun, France, in 1633.

Zahuris (or Zahories)

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Zahuris (or Zahories)
French people who had traveled in Spain frequently had curious
tales to tell concerning the Zahuris —people who were so
keen-sighted that they could see streams of water and veins of
metal hidden in the earth and could indicate the whereabouts
of buried treasure and the bodies of murdered persons.
Explanations were offered on natural lines. It was said that
these men knew where water was to be found by the vapors aris1703
ing at such spots, and that they were able to trace mines of gold,
silver, and copper by the particular herbs growing in their
neighborhood. But to the Spaniards, such explanations were
unsatisfactory; they persisted in believing that the Zahuris were
gifted with supernatural faculties, that they were in rapport
with demons, and that, if they wished, they could, without any
physical aid, read thoughts and discover secrets that were as a
sealed book to the grosser senses of ordinary mortals. The
Zahuris were said to have red eyes, and in order to be a Zahuri
it was necessary to have been born on a Good Friday.

Zaebos

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Zaebos

Said to be the grand count of the infernal regions. He appears
in the shape of a handsome soldier mounted on a crocodile.
His head is adorned with a ducal coronet. He is of a calm and gentle disposition.

Zen (or Ch’an)

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Zen (or Ch’an)

One of the few traditional forms of instant enlightenment
in Oriental religions. However, Zen normally demands a long
a preliminary period of monastic life and spiritual discipline culminating
in the somewhat surrealist techniques that give instant
satori, or enlightenment.
Zen is a special branch of Mahayana Buddhist school (which
dominates Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan), dating from
520 C.E. when Bodhi-Dharma (d. 534 C.E.) went from India to
China with a mission later codified in the maxims ‘‘a special
transmission outside the scriptures; no dependence upon
words and letters; direct pointing at the soul of man; seeing
into one’s nature; and the attainment of Buddhahood.’’ Zen
was later divided into two main schools, called Rinzai and Soto
in Japan.
Rinzai Zen depends very much upon sudden or startling
paradoxes, embodied in koans, mystical riddles such as
‘‘Empty-handed I come, carrying a spade.’’ Modern interest in
Zen often misunderstands the nature of such riddles, where the
verbal factor is merely a trigger to intensify stress in the pupil,
and as a result many Westerners tend to treat Zen as a kind of
intellectual exercise.

In practice, however, such paradoxes were
the culmination of a more formal monastic training emphasizing
traditional spiritual values. The disciple would be fully extended
on all levels of his nature—physically, in the everyday
hard work of the monastery; mentally, in the assimilation of
spiritual teaching; and emotionally, in the sudden clash of unconventional
techniques used in Zen

The koans merely accentuated an intolerable pressure at all
levels, culminating in the sudden flash of enlightenment by
transcendence on a higher, spiritual plane. (See also ZCLA
Journal; Zazen; Zen Studies Society)

Sources:
Humphreys, Christmas. Zen Buddhism. London: Heinemann,
1949. Reprint, New York: Macmillan, 1967.
Suzuki, D. T. Manual of Zen Buddhism. New York: Grove
Press, 1960.
———. Zen Buddhism: Selected Writings of D. T. Suzuki. Edited
by William Barrett. New York: Doubleday/Anchor, 1956.

Zügun, Eleonore

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Zügun, Eleonore (1914– )
A Romanian peasant girl, born in 1914 at Talpa, Romania, the subject of poltergeist persecution and the phenomena of stigmata. Her experiences filled her neighbors with dread. When the phenomena appeared, about 1925, the peasants attributed them to Dracu, the devil, an idea the girl accepted. She was incarcerated in an asylum. The Countess Wassilko-Serecki and her friends heard of the strange case, rescued the girl, and took her to Vienna. The countess published an article and a book about the young girl. The British psychical researcher Harry Price visited Vienna in May 1926 and reported on the phenomena surrounding Zügun in the Journal of the American Society for Psychical
Research (August 1926). He found the phenomena genuine. On Price’s invitation, the countess and her protégée then came to London for an investigation at the National Laboratory of Psychical Research. The case was reported in the NLPR Proceedings
(vol. 1, part 1, January 1927) and widely discussed in the press. Capt. Seton-Karr testified on October 19, 1926 ‘‘I was present on October 5, when the so-called stigmatic markings appeared on the face, arms and forehead of Eleonore Zügun under conditions which absolutely precluded the possibility of Eleonore producing them by scratching or other normal means. The marks were photographed in my presence.’’ The report of the National Laboratory of Psychical Research, after describing various telekinetic and apport phenomena, concluded on the stigmata as follows ‘‘There is not the slightest doubt that our careful experiments, made under ideal scientific conditions, have proved that

‘‘(a) Stigmatic markings appeared spontaneously in various
parts of Eleonore’s body;
‘‘(b) That Eleonore was not consciously responsible for the
production of the marks;
‘‘(c) That under scientific test conditions movements of
small objects without physical contact undoubtedly took place.

The experimenters, unless they are bereft of all human perceptions, cannot possibly come to any other conclusions. ‘‘What has happened to Eleonore is apparently this During
her early childhood when the so-called ‘poltergeist’ phenomena became first apparent, the simple peasants threatened her so often with Dracu (the Devil) and what he would do to her that her subconscious mind became obsessed with the idea of whippings,
bitings, etc., which the ignorant peasants said would be her lot at the hands—or teeth—of Dracu. Remove the Dracu complex and the girl would probably be troubled no further
with stigmatic markings. ‘‘If we have discovered the cause of the ‘stigmata’ I am afraid
we cannot lay claim to having unraveled the mystery of the telekinetic movements of the coins, etc. We have merely proved that they happen.’’ Toward the end of her fourteenth year, at the approach of the menses, Zügun completely lost her psychic powers.
Sources Price, Harry. ‘‘Some Account of the Poltergeist Phenomena of Eleonore Zügun.’’ Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research (August 1926). Wassilko-Serecki, The Countess. ‘‘Observations on Eleonore Zügun.’’ Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research (SeptemberOctober 1925). ———. Der Spuk von Talpa. München, 1926.

Satans Great General Council of the 1700’s

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According to Roger Mordeau, author of a ‘Trip to the Supernatural” a former spirit worshipChristiannt christian, claimed that he was told by a ‘high priest’ that many things would begin in the 1700’s to ‘usher in the end times’.  It was said that the purpose was to declare the coming INDUSTRIAL AGE that would usher in the end times, followed by an age in numerous scientific discoveries.    What most vital to understand about this is something that even Roger Mordeau didn’t seem to catch:

The fact that Industrial chemicals and modern chemistry is what has destroyed not only earth, but man to date.

There were 3 main things discussed that tackled both the earths elements and information.

1. TO make people believe that Satan and his angels DO NOT exist.  Many believe this was the Alien/UFO deception, as UFO’s seen are demons.  This also brought forth the belief in space – that these aliens and UFO’s are coming from realms outside of our ball earth.

2. To have total control over the minds of People through Hypnotism and Mesmerism.   This is done via industrial chemicals and electromagnetic frequencies.  Both usually work in combination with each other for better results.  They result in the body having a lower frequency, changing brain wave patterns and alertness.

3. TO destroy the Bible without Buring it through the Theory of Evolution.  By doing this, not only does #1 work better, but it leads people to hopelessness, the feeling of being lost – that there is no savior, discrediting not just one book, but all of them, indirectly.

If you look at all of the mainstream biggest scientific discoveries, you will see that majority of them have to do with space (which includes physics), and chemistry (chemicals).

Zolar

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‘‘Zolar’’ is a Pseudonym of successful astrologer Bruce King.

‘‘Caquet Bombec’’

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‘‘Caquet Bombec’’
A fourteenth-century song by the poet Jonquieres. It details
an operation in alectromancy, a form of divination using a
cock.

Latest article

Zoomancy

Zoomancy A system of divination based on the appearances and behavior of animals.

Zoaphite

Zoaphite According to the seventeenth-century traveler Jan Struys, a zoaphite was a species of cucumber that fed on neighboring plants. Its fruit had the form of a...

Zabulon

Zabulon This is the name of a demon said to have possessed a lay sister among the community of nuns at Loudun, France, in 1633.

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